Archive for the 'Blend' Category

Jacobs Creek Chardonnay-Pinot Noir Sparkling Wine

Jacobs Creek Chardonnay-Pinot Noir Sparkling WineJacobs Creek Chardonnay Pinot Noir Sparkling Wine (Brut)
(no vintage) SE Australia, $9.50 for 750 ml
(Sparkling White Wine)

Even if you’ve had a bad day, when you pop open a bottle of sparkling wine, you’ve just got to feel like you’re celebrating.  And in my case, I actually was! 

Not only does Jacobs Creek sparkling wine make a birthday meal seem that much more celebratory, but I also found that it is hard to get depressed about aging when you’re sipping on such a tasty beverage.  Now, that ‘s what I call strategy!

The taste? The JC Chardonnay-Pinot Noir was crisp and refreshing with a bit of green apple zing. I suppose that was the Chardonnay talking.  Although this wine was dry, it did have just a hint of sweetness that gave this bubbly a friendly, festive flair without hitting one over the head with cloying sugaryness as some sparkling wines are apt to do.

Bottom line? A bargain dry sparkling wine.  This sparkling JC Chardonnay Pinot Noir was actually served with a  turkey dinner, so the drier nature went well with our meal.  If you’re looking for a dessert sparkling wine however, (or just something a bit sweeter), I would go with something labeled “Sec”, “Demi-Sec” or for really, really sweet, “Doux”. For more info on Sparkling wines, see antiwinesnob’s article on What’s the Difference between Sweet Wine and Dry Wine and look to the last section on Sparkling Wines.

wine’s website: www.jacobscreek.com

Jakob Demmer Liebfraumilch

Jakob Demmer Liebfraumilch

Jakob Demmer Liebfraumilch,

Qualitatswein, 2004, Germany $6.50 for 750 ml (White wine)

Another tasty treat from Germany. And like the Webber Piesporter, this wine doesn’t state a varietal on its label, so I have to assume that it’s a blend of two or more grape varieties.

Whether it’s a blend of Riesling, Spaetburgunder (Pinot Noir), Gewuertztraminer, Scheurebe or other delicious white wines I’ve never heard of (and probably could never spell), all I care about is the fact that the Jakob Demmer Liebfraumilch is down right delicious. And in fact, it reminded me very much of the Webber Piesporter.

Crisp, slightly sweet, honey-ish and round flavored, this wine is very pleasing and fun to drink. It’s the kind of wine you would want around for pretty much any occasion. Plus, the name alone keeps things interesting. According to my Babel Fish translation, Liebfraumilch means “Love Woman’s Milk” or “Dear Woman’s Milk”….

Huh.

I don’t really get it, but if they’re going for the whole Nectar-of-Life theme, they just might be on to something….

Bottom line, this is a good white wine for parties, get togethers, book readings, cozy chats, etc. Although German wines labeled “Liebfraumilch” are apparently considered “cheap” by many and often sneered upon, I thought this stuff was quite good for a casual, fun drink. In fact, although it’s inevitable, I would nevertheless be surprised at a person who doesn’t like it. And awfully curious.

Weber Piesporter Michelsberg

Webber Piesporter MichelsbergWeber Piesporter Michelsberg

2005 Mosel-Saar-Ruwer Region, Germany, $7.00 for 750 ml
(White Wine)

This wine from the Mosel River Valley in Germany seems to actually embody the beauty and gentleness of the place it came from.

While the slate soil hills that the grapes grow on are indeed steep, and tower over the Mosel River that winds its way between them, the overall impression of this area is not what one might think. Steep cliffs with rocky soil would make a person assume the countryside is severe and intimidating, but in fact, the opposite is true. I don’t know if I’ve ever driven through a quainter, more charming and idyllic area than that of the Mosel River Valley. Especially when its in the fall and all the hills are turned golden by the vines and the cobblestone and half-timber villages dotting the countryside all host festivals celebrating the harvest of their grapes.

So enough of sentimentality. What does it taste like? A little sweet and crisp, but also gentle, fun and slightly round-flavored. Its fresh, friendly with just a bit of acidity to keep that zing, but not too much that it isn’t completely pleasant to drink all on its own. In fact, I recommend it. The flavors are very pleasantly perfumy, but to be honest, I couldn’t really single out the particular fruits it called to mind. It tasted of something I’ve had before, but the flavor is not common. Maybe a bit of melon mixed with honey and something else, but I’m not sure what.

While I would like to claim that this wine is a Riesling (due to where it grows and the fact that I’ve seen pictures of Weber Piesporter bottles that had “Riesling” printed on them), I’m not sure if this is a complete Riesling varietal or if it’s a blend. Why? Normally, German wines print both the appellation as well as the grape variety on the bottle if its not a blend. The fact that this bottle doesn’t have “Riesling” on it makes me assume it is a blend of Riesling with some other type of (equally scrumptious) grape.

Technicalities aside, in short, I loved this wine. It is delicious and perfect on its own or with food. Being a bargain wine, it isn’t considered fancy. But it is tasty and perfect for casual sipping. Definitely something I would get again, and, for the price, it’s an excellent find.

Most people drink this wine chilled. But you know what? I actually like it better at room temperature where the flavors are even more aromatic.







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